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Posts Tagged ‘ceramics’

Rosanna Bonnet

Rosanna Bonnet Tile

Rosanna Bonnet was born in Santo Domingo de Guzmán, the capital city of the Dominican Republic and the oldest continuously populated city in the New World. 

Bonnet began her artistic studies in architecture and later switched to graphic design, attending the Altos de Chavon School of Design in the Dominican Republic. She then attended the Royal Academy of Arts of the Hague for one year.  After several years spent back in the Dominican Republic organizing and running a business in serigraphy, she decided to move to the United States for political and economic reasons. 

In 2002 Bonnet worked in a small Medford, MA ceramic studio.  In the spring of 2004, she spent three weeks of intense work at the studio of Frank Giorgini, a ceramic-tile artist in upstate New York.   He recommended her to Nancy Selvage, and she took classes at the HCP Studio in July, 2004, soon becoming part of the staff.  In the fall of 2005, Bonnet began to travel and work in a number of studios including Giorgini’s in NY, a private studio in Geneva, Switzerland, the Tribecca Potters Studio in New York City, and finally as Artist in Residence at Altos de Chavon in the Dominican Republic. Bonnet returned to the HCP Studio this summer and presented a talk and slide show on her recent work. 

Rosanna BonnetThe beautiful old district of Santo Domingo de Guzman, with its Spanish colonial architecture, has been a source of inspiration for Bonnet’s artistic work.  Her favorite ceramics art form is tile, where she says she feels comfortable playing with its surface and creating murals. Her birthplace, with its turquoise waters, lush flora, and abundant sunlight, is reflected in the colors and patterns of her tiles.  Her work is infused with natural themes of orchids, sunflowers and vegetation motifs.   Her hope for the future is to work with architects or to form part of a team involved in interior design.

~Maria Luisa Mansfield, excerpted from Tile Makers in vol 1. number 2, Fall 2008 of Sgraffito the Harvard Ceramics Programs newsletter

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Iraq Map

Shawn Panepinto joined the ceramics program 30 years ago when it was affiliated with Radcliffe College.  Now she teaches classes, manages registration, the semi-annual show and sale and the myriad details of running the studio.  Her presence in the studio can be felt in every corner.  From the time she arrives in her office, people engulf her with questions about anything and everything.  She listens to each, points people to resources, gives or denies permission, resolves quagmires of all sorts and gives advice – which is invariably right.

Panepinto is a graduate of the Ridgewood College of Art (NJ) with concentrations in graphics and commercial art and the Boston Museum School with a dual major in ceramics and painting. One of her early teaching jobs was for the Prison Art Program at Framingham State Prison. Panepinto describes herself as an ‘emotional’ artist as opposed to an ‘intellectual’ one, using her emotions as a source of inspiration. 

Panepinto creates large sculptural pieces, as well as smaller, more functional objects, exploring textures and glazes, generating startling and unexpected contrasts between surface and subject.   Often her forms are humorous or suggest a certain jauntiness. She surprises the viewer with her choice and juxtaposition of color, a palette influenced by her training in painting. She pushes the imagination and shows a gift for the dramatic, revealing her childhood desire to be an actress.

An exhibition of her class’s work at the Fuller Craft Museum in 2007 was a celebration of her 25 years of teaching excellence.  Her sculpture, “U.S. Map of Iraq,” for this show, her largest work to date, exposes the deep and personal emotions aroused by our current involvement in that arena.  Forty-six human heads of textured porcelain are placed along upright rods in an arrangement that mimics the map of Iraq. Tiny impressions of human faces are embedded in each head; the combination of heads and faces represent U.S. soldiers and Iraqi people who have lost their lives.  

Panepinto is a creative teacher.  She generates a safe and nurturing space where people feel challenged to work beyond the edge of their comfort level.  Her class twists and turns around new ideas and techniques.  Each class is usually begun with slides of work from outside sources, illustrating the infinite possibilities of the medium.  In the fast-paced, playfully humorous and highly demanding environment, students exceed their own expectations as they discover their own creative ideas and imagery.

Shawn PanepintoPanepinto’s final class is a banquet, often using tableware made especially for the occasion.  She turns the studio into a magical place decorated with her inexhaustible supply of lights strung around pipes and over the tables.  The sense of celebration is in proportion to all of the hard work and anxious moments during the semester.  The evening cements the bonds built during the weeks of class during which everyone is focused on the common goal of achieving new heights.

~Liz Golbus, excerpted from vol 1. number 2, Fall 2008 of Sgraffito the Harvard Ceramics Programs newsletter

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Please come to the 5th annual Ceramic & Painting Show and Sale by our Ceramics Program participants: Laine Gifford, Holly Dickerman, Gretchen Mamis, Jae Ok Lee.

The show is at the Twin Ash Farm Barn in Sudbury, MA on Saturday – Sunday, July 18 – 19, 10 am – 6 pm.
5th Barn Show 1
barn2barn3

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Ghafar Mohiudin

Ghafar Mohiudin

Ghafar Mohiu­din, Lecturer of Ceramics Design at the University of Gujrat, Paki­stan, worked with us at the HCP Studio for four months this spring. Mohiudin received a grant from the Pakistani govern­ment to learn our methods of slip casting, glazing and firing in various modes. He is participating in the Mold Making and the Glaze Chemistry classes and assisting in a third class.

Ghafar MohiudinIn 2004 Mohiudin graduated from the National College of Arts in Lahore with a Bachelor of Design degree and has had further ex­perience and train­ing in various art forms, in theater, and in graphic and web design. His work in ceramics reflects this diversity by incorpo­rating disparate elements from his background. One of his sculptural installations appeared in the show Clay Clan-I in 2007 at the Alhamra Art Gal­lery in Lahore. A spotlight mounted in the center of each surrounding clay wheel and a mass of wires tangled at the base are reminis­cent of both the theater and the wired world of electronics. Mohiudin’s cup form reveals his design experience and is one that he hopes to translate into a mold.

~Suzanne Garen-Fazio, excerpted from vol 1. number 3 spring 2009 of Sgraffito, the Harvard Ceramics Program newsletter

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Flow Mural

The Harvard community is fortunate to have Nancy Selvage as the director of the ceramics program, a position she has held since 1978. During this time Selvage has produced a large body of public sculptural and mural work as well as other pieces shown in galleries and museums. She has also written articles and grant proposals, organized many scholarly and hands-on symposia, taught classes at the studio, and attended residencies and meetings in the field.

Selvage began her undergraduate studies at Wellesley College assuming a premed track. Fascinated by art history, she soon decided to pursue a career in art, ultimately earning an M.F.A. in Sculpture from Tufts University, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The sciences have, however, continued to wield a strong influence on her creative work, which she has successfully blended in her choice of subject and handling of the material.

One mark of her scientific approach is the meticulous research she does for each project, finding the most appropriate combinations of clays, glazes or other materials, and checking and testing every detail, every creature in a mural, every scientific formula or animal color and shape, every metal or method to be used, so that the finished product will please and endure.

In her impressive body of work, three major pieces stand out, representing her permanent public, ceramic art. In order by date of fabrication, the first is a ceramic tile mural, “Sonoran Snake”, a 50-foot-long rattlesnake whose skin is colorfully decorated with desert animals and plants. Created in 1993, it is attached to a wall leading to the entrance of the Sonora Desert Pavilion at the North Carolina Zoo at Asheboro, North Carolina.

The second is a group of ceramic pieces, created in 2000, for the Canyon View Information Plaza at the Grand Canyon. One part, “Canyon Rim”, is a 3D relief map model of 30 miles of the South Canyon, essentially replicating the topography of the rim area. It interfaces with a floor photo of the Canyon and orients visitors to the area. Another part, “Grand Canyon Camouflage”, consists of 30 low-relief sculptures of plants, animals and fossils that decorate the walls of the orientation building.

The third piece, “Flow”, constructed in 2005, is a ceramic tile mural located on the Science Building at Keene State College in Keene, N.H. It is in the shape of the local Ashuelot River and is a ‘river of scientific knowledge’ elaborately filled with symbols and images from all of the sciences.

In her artists statement she declares:

Nancy SelvageI have always been interested in the overlapping connections and associations between a functional object and the significance of its specific or broader context. A series of plates became embodiments of table manners; a table was inscribed with a litany of food blessings; some map vessels poured specific river systems; the Iraq vessel poured oil; “Wishing Well” pulled the gallery space into a vortex; “Nuclear Home” hovered between cohesion and fallout; a hearth endangered a hunt; one educational mural became a mythic snake ;another became a river of knowledge; a wall animated the streetscape and sheltered the plaza. Whether I start with a plate on a table or a wall in a plaza I work in response to the character and context of that private or public site, with the need to enhance awareness, transform experience, and discover new means of expression.

For images of Selvage’s sculpture click here.

~Suzanne Garen-Fazio, excerpted from vol. 1, number 1 Summer 2008 of Sgraffito, the Harvard Ceramics Program newsletter

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Meng Zhao Sculpture

Meng Zhao came to the Harvard Ceramics Program studio as an Artist in Residence in 2005, where he has taught classes in traditional Chinese brush painting and clay surface design. Inspired by ancient Chinese rocks and water forms, and by Chinese philosophy, Zhao’s work has brought him wide recognition and several prizes, including the Gold Medal at the 53rd International Ceramic Art Competition in Faenza, Italy, 2003.

Zhao’s current work reflects his process of bridging the two distinct cultures of ancient East and modern West. His sculptural pieces explore the ancient paradigms of Chinese art to test the boundaries of form and balance, surface and texture, made possible with clay and glazes. Zhao prefers clay for the qualities of flexibility and suppleness of the material. Philosophically he is attracted by the combination of elements in the ceramics process, earth and water, fire and air, complementing each other rather than competing with each other.

Rocks in China have long been admired as an essential feature in gardens, representing a miniaturization of mountains and inviting meditation and contemplation. Prized by collectors, scholar’s rocks are a natural sculptural form, found and refined, and can be viewed as a major three-dimensional tradition of Chinese art. Non-traditional colors, textures, and shapes have emerged in the rock and water pieces Zhao has created at the Harvard Ceramics Program. Zhao creates his scholar’s rocks with an eye to his Asian past and with a hand in contemporary clay sculpture. Similarly, Zhao creates clay images of water and waves that have a visual reference to the calligraphic line in Chinese brush painting. Following the teachings of the Tao Te Ching as a source of inspiration, Zhao uses the philosophy of vacuity or emptiness, “form is emptiness, emptiness is form”, as a common theme in his work.

Meng Zhao

 We put thirty spokes together and call it a wheel; But it is on the space where there is nothing that the usefulness of the wheel depends.  We turn clay to make a vessel; But it is on the space where there is nothing that the usefulness of the vessel depends. We pierce doors and windows to make a house; And it is on these spaces where there is nothing that the usefulness of the house depends. Therefore just as we take advantage of what is, we should recognize the usefulness of what is not.

 Chapter 11 of the Tao Te Ching  (translated by Waley)

 –Maria Luisa Mansfield, excerpted from vol. 1, number 1 Summer 2008 of Sgraffito, the Harvard Ceramics Program newsletter

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South Station

2 to 1

Pam Gorgone is a Ceramics Program instructor and a long-time Non-Resident Tutor and ceramics Instructor at Harvard’s Mather House. Her small scale sculptural work, often focusing on sets and serial objects, has been described as quiet, meditative, and elemental. Pushing the limits of porcelain’s plasticity she rises to the challenge of making ultra-thin hand-built pieces, and is more interested in the color being part of the material rather than something applied to the surface. “Born to pot,” Pam finds inspiration in repetition and rhythm, the paintings of Agnes Martin and the sculpture of Donald Judd, and the interrelationships within her own family. She prefers the “doing and the making” of her vessels and sculptural componants and, once they have been fired, in their recombination.

 

Pam Gorgone Pam Gorgone BFA at Tufts/Museum School and instructor at Harvard’s Mather House.

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