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Archive for March, 2009

 

South Station

2 to 1

Pam Gorgone is a Ceramics Program instructor and a long-time Non-Resident Tutor and ceramics Instructor at Harvard’s Mather House. Her small scale sculptural work, often focusing on sets and serial objects, has been described as quiet, meditative, and elemental. Pushing the limits of porcelain’s plasticity she rises to the challenge of making ultra-thin hand-built pieces, and is more interested in the color being part of the material rather than something applied to the surface. “Born to pot,” Pam finds inspiration in repetition and rhythm, the paintings of Agnes Martin and the sculpture of Donald Judd, and the interrelationships within her own family. She prefers the “doing and the making” of her vessels and sculptural componants and, once they have been fired, in their recombination.

 

Pam Gorgone Pam Gorgone BFA at Tufts/Museum School and instructor at Harvard’s Mather House.

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tea set

tea set

For Harvard senior Dave Tischfield the freedom he finds in the studio, where he can ‘just start making’ anything that he can imagine, serves as welcome relief for the stresses and ‘reality’ of working on hardcore lab science. Since freshman year Tischfield’s creative passion for making and firing ceramic sculpture and vessels has been infectious. With wit and energy Tischfield has produced Clay All Night, a popular undergraduate studio party;  taught classes at the Quincy House ceramics studio; run studio workshops for kids with AIDS; and contributed to Ceramics Program presentations for Harvard’s Arts First Festival, a variety of student groups and courses, and the City of Cambridge’s  Riverfest.

David TischfieldWhile giving his students the skills they need to accomplish their creative goals has been both fun and rewarding for Tischfield, ultimately he plans to build on his undergraduate neurobiological research by pursuing an MDPhD. But first he will take a year off after graduation, dividing his time between polishing his thesis for publication and finally having the opportunity to focus on his own sculpture and pottery projects. If he receives sufficient funding, these projects might include studying at a ceramics workshop in China, and field work in Nicaragua to help establish a ceramics microenterprise development project. ~Sue Post

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Lucy Scanlon

wave tiles

wave tiles

Lucy Scanlon credits the required and often difficult ‘source talks’ she gave as a graduate student at RISD with helping her understand “what I wish my pots were about.” Verbalizing her intentions, she says, is like being forced to throw on a kick wheel, where a potter translates their effort into kinetic energy that in turn becomes the potential energy used to create the pot. The roster of mentors Scanlon has worked with as she moved about with her growing family includes first-tier ceramicists Toshiko Takaezu at Princeton, Mikhail Zakim and Byron Temple in NYC, and Makoto Yabe at the DeCordova Museum school. Scanlon inspires her own students to work with ideas and forms that excite them, in addition to imparting technique. Her love of the sea, which she enjoys from a summer studio on Martha’s Vineyard, is evident in both the aqua color and water motifs of many of her soda-fired slab and altered wheel-thrown pieces.

Lucy ScanlonLucy Scanlon BA in Geology in Harvard College; MFA in Ceramics from Rhode Island School of Design; former instructor of ceramics at Rhode Island School of Design. Lucy makes hand built and wheel thrown functional pottery, often incorporating animal and water motifs.

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erotic table setting

erotic table setting

The diversity of Amy Woods’ fanciful table settings belies her abiding commitment to the integrity of the various clays and glazes as well as the piles of found objects she often uses as source material. While not intending to be too obvious or offensive, Woods’ work subverts the concepts of identity and playfulness, and pushes the opposing boundaries of both sculptural and surface decoration. AS a TA and summer course instructor, Woods encourages her students to relate their ceramic practice to their life outside the studio. ~Sue Post

 

Amy Woods

Amy Woods graduated from Boston University with a B.A. in German literature.  Her next endeavor was to transform herself into  a professional potter getting most of her education “hands on” through the Harvard Ceramics Studio (formerly the Radcliffe Pottery Studio) with the addition of some summer workshops with Walter Ostram and Marilyn Dintenfass.  She has produced an abundance of specialty presentation-ware for vegetables, fruits, beverages, and blancmange, that is not to be trifled with.

 

 

 

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Flat Fish

Flat Fish

Stephanie Young     Artist Statement

I base all of my work on designs created first by the earth.  I have yet to lose my childlike curiosity about the existence of things, and I attempt to channel that energy into making curious work.

My work is inspired by forms found in the various fields of science.  Oceanography is a well of inspiration I have been working with in several series of pieces.   One is a series of vessels that have textures inspired by microscopic exploration of ocean life.  The textures are familiar to us through our knowledge of science, though foreign to the naked eye.  These vessels are classic forms, decorated with new science.   The resulting pieces are a nice rounded representation of time.

Another series has been my creation of tremendous numbers of invented fish.  These sculptures have the characteristics found in prehistoric fish combined with those of current deep sea discoveries.  Evolution, environment, and their effects on the form of these creatures are a great inspiration for my own creative evolution.  They seem to bring a great joy to the people who meet them, children and adults alike. 

 Clay is my chosen medium as I find it is the only medium that allows one to be totally free in the creative process.  While I often sketch and paint, it confines my invention to a two dimensional plane.  I am fascinated with all aspects in the ceramic process, and look forward to spending all my years playing in the mud.

Stephanie YoungStephanie Young BFA in Sculpture, Art Institute of Boston, Ceramics studio manager and instructor New Art Center, Newton, MA. Instructor at Wheelock College. Stephanie creates functional vessels and sculpture with a wide range of clay materials, hand building and wheel throwing techniques and firing methods.

 

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stateofclayCongratulations! to 15 of studio participants, who are juried into The State of Clay. The opening is Sunday, March 29, 3 – 5 pm at the Lexington Arts & Crafts Society, 130 Waltham Street, Lexington, MA 02421. www.lexington.org/LACS

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Monday, March 30, 2009 at 10 am – 12 pm

Presentation and demonstration by Niisato Akio on his translucent porcelain vessels and sculpture.nisato4_crop_web

Niisato Akio has mastered and adapted the historic technique of imbedding rice grains in porcelain in order to create translucent patterns of light that interact with his sculptural and vessel forms.

If you want to join us, RSVP to Nancy Selvage at selvage@fas.harvard.edu. Fee: Free for Harvard Students and Ceramics Program participants; $35 for all others
www.fas.harvard.edu

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